Category Archives: BLOG

Her Jacket

by Allie Burke

Usually women with schizophrenia are diagnosed in their twenties. The same went for me, but my symptoms started around 3 years years old. I just didn’t know it at the time. Most children have monsters in their closets or under their beds, and as I got older, I figured it had to do with that, even if they were still there. Humans—we’re such odd creatures. Always looking for the excuse that makes us normal.

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Prisoned by Marni Mann

by Allie Burke

Its been at least twelve hours since I read the last page of this book, and I’m still reeling. This novel is like when you lose your grasp on reality for just a moment and you have to ask yourself what the fuck just happened. It’s a mindfuck for sure. I still haven’t figured out the ending – I heard from other readers the ending was like WTF – but I wasn’t expecting that. You’re so focused on the big reveal during the whole thing that Mann pulls a fast one on you with what seems like no effort at all; it is so seamless. I still don’t quite understand what happened. I considered asking the author myself since she is a personal friend of mine, but truth be told I’m kind of embarrassed that I don’t have it figured out yet. I’ll get it I’m sure, even if I have to read it again.

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Thoughts About Maggie Stiefvater and Her Contribution to Storytelling

by Allie Burke

I haven’t much thought about Maggie Stiefvater being my favorite author as much as I have considered her to be my favorite person. When I’m asked for my favorites, I tend to gravitate to the works of John Green and Sarah Addison Allen because it was their words that got me to write. But if you ask me what my favorite first line of a book is (I’m a nerd for stuff that gets people to keep reading), I will always quote The Scorpio Races:

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The Untouchables (Ruthless People, #2) by J.J. McAvoy

by Allie Burke

I published a review of this book when I was only 71 pages in, DNFing it at 16%. I was annoyed at the plot-driven anti-developer of a book. But, I got back to it yesterday because I just so badly want to like this series, and it was surprisingly, unputdownable from that point. I finished the rest of it in two days. It had its flaws – endless typos, bad, banal writing like “I let out the breath I didn’t know I was holding”, and the whole annoying thing where Liam calls Melody “Wife” (it’s all very insincere, this thing they do) – but this time, very much unlike the first book, I fell hard for the Callahans. I even had feels in some parts, which had been an nonexistent phenomenon with this series up until this point.

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Self Reliance: The Rise of the Millennial

by Allie Burke

In his piece, Self-Reliance, Ralph Waldo Emerson presents the idea that we must be self-reliant—in our ideas, beliefs, environment, and ultimately, in the structure of our lives—to be an individual in society. But Emerson wrote this piece in 1841. How do his ideas of non-conformity apply today? People my age, with mental illnesses, who are somewhat offended by the statements “Millennials ruin everything; we can’t even joke around anymore” or “When I was your age I owned a house” but are also somewhat uncomfortable by the idea of identifying as Millennials because we work 8-to-5 jobs—where do we fit in, and how? Our generation seeks to never conform, but what about those of us who still work in Corporate America and who still care about what people think of us? How can we be self-reliant but also thrive in a world that so obviously doesn’t respect that idea? What would Emerson do?

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